Category Archives: Libraries

25 Favorite Children’s Books About Diversity

Best 25 Children’s Books About DiversitySearching around for a really special gift for multicultural families and teachers working in diverse communities? Check out our new, exclusive collection of 25 of the best multicultural books for grades 1-3 that celebrate diversity and teach children about different cultures. (Note: Additional sets targeted to Pre-K through K, and to grades 3-5, are also available on the Language Lizard site.)

New Set of Multicultural Books Makes a Memorable Gift for Teachers & Families

The books portray children from various backgrounds, including Hispanic, Asian, African American, Middle-Eastern, and Native American. The stories help children embrace their unique heritage, better understand the immigrant experience, and enjoy entertaining folktales from around the world.

With this collection, children in diverse communities will appreciate those around them and build selfesteem as they read books in which their cultures and ethnicities are represented.

All books in this set are in English. If you are looking for bilingual multicultural books, click here or visit our language-specific pages.

Multicultural Stories Include:

  • An inspiring book about an immigrant girl from Korea looking to fit into her new life in America. A “Best Children’s Book of the Year” by Publishers Weekly and School Library Journal, this story is very relatable to children of all backgrounds moving to the United States, trying to create a new home.
  • A story about a young girl during the holy month of Ramadan who must choose between covering for her brother and doing the right thing.
  • A child is reminded to be proud of her unique and special hair and, more importantly, proud of who she is. Many children and adults alike will relate to this story of self-acceptance and self-love.
  • A folktale from Thailand that teaches a valuable lesson about being thankful for what you have, and the risks of having much more than you need.
  • A girl who has lost her vision is able to overcome adversity to run in her school’s Field Day race. With the help of her friends, teachers and family, she proves that she is able to do all the same things that somebody with sight can do.
  • A heartwarming story showing the hardships an elderly person faces when adjusting to life in a new country, and how a grandmother and grandchild are able to help their family by sharing parts of their culture.
  • The story of two girls, one Jewish and one Muslim, and their beautiful friendship. Both go to great lengths to care for the other’s well-being, providing valuable lessons to all children who read this book.
  • A story about the discrimination African Americans faced in the workplace teaches children about the simple things that were denied to them, and how many people bravely fought to end these unfair practices.
  • A Penn Belpre Honor Book Award winner, this story about relating to your grandparents, who do not share the same customs or language as you, pertains to many second or third generation children in America.
  • A simple chapter book about a young Latino reporter who will do anything to find out how a worm got into her friend Javier’s burger. She hopes this story will be her big break to becoming a distinguished reporter!
  • The struggles of an immigrant Chinese family to settle into their new life in America are relieved when a stranger helps them connect to their past home in a way they did not know was possible.
  • Winner of a Benjamin Franklin Award, Moonbeam Children’s Book Award and the Children’s Choice Award, this Native American folktale shares the important lesson of believing in yourself and not listening to the negative words of others.
  • A Coretta Scott King Award winning story about the hardships of life as an African American girl in the early 1900’s who wants to attend school, her fight to get there, and the ambitious learner she becomes through hard work and dedication.
  • A story about the daughter of migrant workers who feels as if she cannot find her place anywhere since her family is constantly moving according to the harvest. Eventually, she succeeds in making her mark.
  • A young girl living in West Africa wants to be like the other women in her family and wear a malafa, but her family believes she is too young to wear it. She wants to show them that she is old enough to understand the significance of wearing it and respect the sacred act.
  • A Vietnamese folktale about brothers who lead very different lives, one rich and one poor, and how fate always has a way of making things even in the end.
  • An enlightening story about a young boy trying to escape the shadow of his father because they have the same name. He loves his father dearly, but wants to create his own name so he can have a different legacy.
  • A children’s book that teaches the importance of diversity and how it makes us unique. The children in the book learn that being nice to everyone regardless of what they look like is crucial, and that everyone deserves to be treated with the same respect and dignity.
  • A Caldecott Medal winner, this book shares the touching story of a young man who came to America in search of a new life and adventure, and his eventual return to his home country of Japan. The book then shares his daughter’s and his grandson’s story, coming full circle in the end.
  • A classic Chinese folktale about a duck that is taken by a Lord who wants to keep him as a prized possession.  A kind maid releases the bird and faces punishment, but will her deeds be rewarded?
  • A multicultural book that follows a boy going around the world to learn about different cultures and to meet diverse people. The details and friendly illustrations allow readers to travel around the world in a book.
  • A Cherokee legend about a husband and wife who quarrel, and then make up by a field of sweet strawberries, teaches important lessons about the act of forgiveness and gratitude.
  • Two Jim Crow era young African American girls fight discrimination by creating a shoe store of their own where African Americans can try on shoes in the store, which is something they cannot do in any store operated by a white person. This story teaches important historic lessons while also showing children who persevere in the face of adversity.
  • Ganesha, a young elephant child, loves anything sweet and sugary, but he takes his love too far. A humorous twist on a classic tale (with amazing, colorful illustrations) that introduces Indian culture and Hindu literature.
  • A Caldecott Honor Book that shows a community coming together to help a family in need, and celebrates the joy of working hard to save up for something special.

A few reviews of the books in this collection:

– “A sensitive and inspiring portrait of a family’s triumph in the face of adversity.” – Kirkus Reviews

– “Wonderful watercolor illustrations complete this sensitive, sweet story of learning to love yourself without compromise.” – Chicago Tribune

– “The immigrant experience has rarely been so poignantly evoked as it is in this direct, lyrical narrative that is able to stir emotions through the sheer simplicity of its telling… [The illustrations] seem to be moments taken from life, intensely personal and at the same time giving voice to and confirming an experience shared by countless others.” – Horn Book, starred review

“Yoon may be new to America, but her feelings as an outsider will be recognizable to all children.” – Publishers Weekly, starred review

– “This one stands tall not just for delving into a piece of labor history not previously covered, but for its ability to relate history with heart in resonance.” – Kirkus Reviews, starred review

– “..a picture book story influenced by Native American folklore. The stylized artwork and the educational addendum perfectly complement this enchanting fairy tale.” – Midwest Book Review

– “Celebrates the natural world simplified, softened, and sunlit. A delectable choice for reading aloud.” – Booklist

– “A tender knockout… it’s rare to find much vitality, spontaneity, and depth of feeling in such a simple, young book.” – Kirkus Reviews

– “… rich with magic, compassion and love. …elegant watercolor and pastel drawings… are exquisite.” – Publishers Weekly

– “When Shirin helps Ali, it changes their relationship and reveals the meaning of Ramadan.” – Booklist

– “A poignant yet realistic story… stunningly illustrated.” – Choices, Cooperative Children’s Book Center

25 Must-Read Multicultural Books for Preschoolers and Kindergartners

Set of 25 multicultural children's booksLanguage Lizard is thrilled to offer a new, exclusive collection of must-read multicultural books for preschool and kindergarten children! This set of books gives you an instant, award-winning library of diverse books for your classroom or home. No need to search around! We’ve selected 25 of our favorite multicultural stories that expose children to cultural and ethnic diversity and celebrate differences.

The books portray children from various backgrounds, including African American, Hispanic, Middle-Eastern, Asian and Native American. The set includes stories related to the immigrant experience, books that help children embrace their unique heritage, and folktales from around the world. 

The entertaining and well-reviewed stories help students appreciate diversity and build community with those around them. Children in diverse classrooms will build self esteem as they read/hear books in which their culture or ethnicity is represented. (Note: All books in this set are in English. Educators looking for bilingual multicultural booksclick here or visit Language Lizard’s language-specific pages.

Stories Included in the Collection

  • An Ezra Jack Keats Book Award winner that explores the similarities of two children who live in very different communities across the world.
  • A child revels in who she is despite her differences. An ode to self-esteem, with fun and silly illustrations.
  • An Asian folktale in which a young child is rewarded for his honesty and loyalty. An IRA-CBC Children’s Choice and An American Bookseller “Pick of the Lists.”
  • A sweet story in which a girl helps her Tia (aunt) earn money for a new car (since much of their savings goes to relatives who live far away). Winner of an Ezra Jack Keats New Writer Award, an Amelia Bloomer List Selection and an American Library Association Notable Children’s Book.
  • An introduction to Ramadan in which a young boy shares his experiences of this special time and wants to try to fast like the grown-ups do.
  • A book that looks at children all over the world and illustrates our common humanity.
  • A child is teased for looking different and learns how to celebrate his differences.
  • A book celebrating non-violent social change and winner of the Coretta Scott King Award, illustrated by a three-time Caldecott Honor Recipient.
  • A Latino boy “conquers the world” (except his sisters!) while teaching kids about a theatrical, action-packed sport that is popular in many Spanish-speaking countries. A Pura Belpre Illustrator Award winner, a Bank Street Best Children’s Book of the Year and an ALSC Notable Children’s Book.
  • Observing the features that make us unique, a story that celebrates what makes each child special.
  • A Chinese girl learns to appreciate what her culture has to offer during an “American” holiday. An IRA Notable Book for a Global Society.
  • A simple introduction to racial and ethnic diversity that teaches children that you can’t tell what someone is like from the color of their skin. An ALA Notable Book.
  • A book with diverse characters that inspires and guides young children to recognize their self-worth and develop confidence in themselves. Includes a section of discussion questions, activities, games and tips.
  • A trickster gets into trouble when he tries to do what goes against his nature. Winner of an ALA Notable Children’s Book, an ABA Pick of the Lists, and a National Parenting Publications Gold Award.
  • A story that uses colors as the backdrop for sharing Muslim culture, with artwork that brings classical elements of Islamic art into a modern setting.
  • A classic Chinese legend in which a poor boy helps thwart a greedy emperor’s plan.
  • With bright, bold illustrations, an artistic child notices and appreciates the colors of her friends.
  • A young girl delights in her favorite Korean dish… with details about how readers can prepare it themselves!
  • A reassuring book that encourages kids to embrace their individuality and celebrate multiculturalism.
  • A lovely Native American folktale that cautions children against bragging and teasing. An NCSS-CBC Notable Children’s Trade Book in the Field of Social Studies and a Parenting Magazine Reading-Magic Award Winner.
  • A look at different families around the world, what they do and how they help each other.
  • A Caldecott Medal winner, magical woodcuts are used in an Indian fable that explores big versus little, and the nature of pride.
  • A book celebrating different cultures illustrates that the things that make us different also make us special.
  • A simple story about friendship with culturally diverse characters and suggested after-reading activities.
  • A lovely book about the children of the world and their inherent similarities. Supports The Global Orphan Project.

Just a Few Reviews of the Books in this Collection

  • “Bold illustrations celebrate diversity with a child’s open-hearted sensibility and a mother’s love.” – Kirkus Reviews
  • “With its universal themes of wanting to fit in, self-acceptance, and self-esteem, this read-aloud is sure to strike a chord with many young readers/listeners, and on a variety of subjects, not just race.” – School Library Journal
  • “Explores the child’s experience of straddling two cultures – and serves up an ending as satisfying as sweet-and-sour pork and crusty dessert.” -The Washington Post
  • “A beautifully crafted book that will be enjoyed as much for the richness of its illustrations as the simplicity of its story.” – School Library Journal
  • “Children will appreciate the warm, personal narrative, as well as the connections with Muslims all over the world.” – Booklist
  • “Beautiful full-color illustrations portray this ancient Chinese folktale…” – Notable Children’s Trade Books in the Field of Social Studies
  • “A splendid tale, perfectly paced for an amusing read-aloud” – Publisher’s Weekly (starred review)
  • “… strong, dramatic woodcuts perfectly interpret the old fable.” – School Library Journal
  • “[An easy read] with child-friendly illustrations and easy-to-understand examples of real-life situations.” – Skipping Stones: A Multicultural Children’s Magazine.
  • “Expressive, child’s-eye watercolors get in on all the activity… in this celebration of a well-loved cultural dish” – Horn Book
  • “… [focuses] on positive thinking and assertive, kind behavior that can bolster children’s mental health, their relationships, and their performance in school.” – Sean Covey, best-selling author of The 7 Habits of Happy Kids
  • “Beautiful…. This will enrich and spark discussions of diversity.” – Booklist
  • “The Strength of family and the importance of pursuing one’s dreams are the bedrock of [this…] picture book.” – Publishers Weekly
  • “An essential book that acknowledges in the simplest of terms our common humanity.” – Kirkus Reviews

Unique Children’s Books About Diversity

 Children's Books About Diversity: English-only Multicultural Book Sets

Language Lizard is excited to offer new sets of Multicultural Books in English. They are a great way to introduce kids to new cultures and traditions, and to celebrate diversity in the classroom and at home.

New Multicultural Book Sets

CULTURAL HOLIDAYS: DIWALI, EID & CHINESE NEW YEAR (3 BOOK SET)Our Cultural Holidays set helps children learn about 3 important holidays around the world: Diwali, Chinese New Year and Eid. Each of the books in this set is used in our multicultural lesson plans about these important holidays. Readers can download the multicultural lesson plans for free.

CHILDREN'S BOOKS ABOUT DIVERSITY: FOOD, GAMES, TRANSPORTATION (3 BOOK SET)Our set of Children’s Books About Diversity: Food, Games, Transportation takes kids on a trip around the world, exploring the rich diversity of children’s lives. Kids will learn about exotic dishes, different games children play and the ways people get around in different countries.

Bilingual Multicultural Books

Please note that in addition to these English sets, we continue to offer bilingual multicultural books in 50+ languages! Readers can easily search by language on our site to find the right books in their languages of interest.

Mugs that Celebrate Diversity & Languages – Back-to-School Gifts for Teachers and Students!

Mugs bilingual and multicultural gifts

It’s that time of year again – summer is winding down, and school is back in session! Language Lizard is offering a new set of colorful mugs that celebrate cultural diversity and the love of languages – perfect for educators, students and parents alike!

“Welcome” in Different Languages

"Welcome" in many languages multicultural mug

This unique mug says “Welcome” in many languages, and is a great gift for teachers who work in multicultural classrooms. Languages include Arabic, Burmese, Chinese, Czech, Dutch, Farsi (Persian), French, German, Greek, Gujarati, Haitian-Creole, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Lithuanian, Nepali, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Somali, Spanish, Swedish, Tagalog, Turkish, Ukrainian, Vietnamese and Yoruba.

Bilingual Superpower

Bilingual Superpower mug

Learning a new language takes dedication and a lot of hard work! Let the world know about your bilingual superpower! A great gift for students and teachers that encourages and promotes language learning. English-only edition of this mug is also available.

“We All Smile in the Same Language”

"We all smile in the same language" bilingual mug

Our “We all smile in the same language” bilingual mug has English on one side and Spanish on the other (English-only mug also available). A fun way to celebrate diversity and inclusion while enjoying your favorite beverage.

All mugs are 11oz  and microwave safe. Happy sipping!

NEW MULTILINGUAL “TALKING” CHARTS: English, Geography, STEM (for use with PENpal Recorder Pen)

New Multilingual "Talking" Charts

Language Lizard is pleased to announce new multilingual “talking” charts that allow students to hear explanations of key terms in English, geography, math & science in many different languages, including English, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese and Russian.

These charts are invaluable resources for teachers who support a linguistically diverse student body. Using these charts with the PENpal Audio Recorder Pen, newcomers and English Language Learners (ELLs) can hear key terms explained in their native languages, allowing for a better understanding of subject matter content.

Students simply select the language that they want to hear from the right side of the chart with the PENpal, and then tap a subject term to hear an explanation of the word in the selected language. Teachers and students can also use “talking labels” (recordable stickers) to add their own recordings of additional information to the chart.

There are four new Talking Charts, and they can be purchased separately or in a value pack of 4 Multilingual Charts.

English Multilingual Terms Chart

English Multilingual Terms Chart

The English Multilingual Terms Chart includes explanations and examples for terms such as alliteration, apostrophe, conjunction, differentiate, figurative, imagery, narrative/narrator, onomatopoeia, personification, preposition and synonym.

Geography Multilingual Terms Chart

Multilingual Terms Chart

The Geography Multilingual Terms Chart includes explanations for erosion, estuary, habitat, infrastructure, landscape, latitude, longitude, pollution, settlement and much more.

Math Multilingual Terms Chart

Math Multilingual Terms Chart

The Math Multilingual Terms Chart includes terms such as adjacent, circumference, coordinate, decimal, denominator, diameter, equilateral, fraction, isosceles, perimeter, perpendicular, radius, ratio, symmetry and vertical.

Science Multilingual Terms Chart

Science Multilingual Terms Chart

The Science Multilingual Terms Chart includes absorb, amphibian, circulation, condensation, combustion, evaporation, friction, nutrient, organism, particles, respiration, vertebrate and more key terms.

Multilingual Phrases for School Talking Chart

Multilingual Phrases for School Talking Chart

These new charts work alongside our popular Multilingual Phrases for School Talking Chart which allows teachers and administrators to communicate more easily with student language learners as well as parents who do not speak English well.

The following languages are available on the charts: Arabic, Czech, English, Farsi, French, Lithuanian, Mandarin Chinese, Panjabi, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Slovakian, Somali, Spanish, Sylheti, Turkish, Urdu, Vietnamese and Yorub

You can get more detailed information on these multilingual “talking” charts, and also check out all of our PENpal products and literacy value sets.

“Hello” & “Welcome” in Different Languages: Multicultural Posters Celebrate Cultural Diversity & Welcome Newcomers

Welcome classroom poster in many languages

Teachers want to make children feel valued and comfortable from the day they arrive at school.  One of the first things a child or caregiver will notice when they enter a new classroom is the way it looks. Imagine if one of the first things a child sees is a poster that says “Welcome” in different languages, including their own! Or if they are greeted with “Hello” in different languages!

Multilingual classroom poster that says "Hello"

Newcomers who do not speak English well, and children from different cultural backgrounds, may not feel they fit in if they see only the English language and American imagery on the walls.  If these children instead see their culture represented, they will feel more welcome and acknowledged.

Here are some other items that can be displayed in classrooms to create a welcoming environment:

  • Flags from around the world
  • Multilingual posters depicting themes the class will be studying (e.g. weather, animals, food, shapes, transportation, etc)
  • Photos and artwork depicting people from different countries
  • Famous landmarks around the world
  • Signs showing areas of the classroom in different languages
  • Artwork from students representing their culture or home country.

To help you decorate your multicultural classroom (or library), we are offering a special discount on our NEW multilingual poster 3-pack during the month of April 2017. This set of 3 posters lets you display Hello, Thank You and Welcome in different languages. Each poster includes over 30 different languages! The discount is available online – no coupon code required.

Multicultural classroom poster that says "Thank You"

The following languages are included on some or all of the posters: Albanian, Arabic, Bengali, Bulgarian, Chinese (Cantonese / Mandarin), Croatian, Czech, Dutch, English, Farsi, Finnish, French, Fulani, Gaelic, German, Greek, Gujarati, Haitian Creole, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Irish, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Kurdish, Latvian, Lithuanian, Luganda, Malayalam, Nepali, Norwegian, Panjabi, Polish, Portuguese, Romani, Romanian, Romany, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, Slovakian, Slovenian, Somali, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Tagalog, Tamil, Turkish, Twi, Ukranian, Urdu, Vietnamese, Welsh and Yoruba.

If you are interested in other multilingual posters, with varied themes, please visit the Multilingual Posters, Teaching Cards & World Maps page on our website.

Multicultural Books for National Reading Month & Giveaway!

woman in a library

National Reading Month is a great time to try out a new multicultural book with your little ones! Celebrate with fun, diverse children’s books that introduce them to different cultures. And don’t miss out on the Multicultural Stories Giveaway we are co-sponsoring with our friends at I Teach K-2!

What is National Reading Month?

Every March, National Reading Month kicks off with NEA’s Read Across America, which celebrates the birthday of the beloved Dr. Seuss. All month long, organizations across the country hold events that celebrate the love of reading, and encourage kids and adults to enjoy new books or re-visit old favorites.

Our Favorite Multicultural Books for Children

If you’re looking to grow your classroom or personal library by adding great multicultural picture books the kids will love, here are some of our favorites. (Each title is available in English plus your choice of a second language, so kids get to explore a second language, too!)

Grandma’s Saturday Soup

Grandma's Saturday Soup - multicultural children's book

Each day, something new makes Mimi think of her grandma, whom she misses very much. She misses Grandma’s special Saturday Soup, and her stories of life in Jamaica. Derek Brazell’s colorful illustrations brings this story to life, and make us wish we all had a remarkable grandma like this!

Welcome to the World Baby

Welcome to the World Baby - diverse children's books

How are new babies celebrated around the world? Tariq’s classroom gets to meet his new baby brother. During circle time, the students share the different ways their families welcome new babies into the world. Na’ima bint Robert brings us a beautiful, thoughtful exploration of cultural and religious diversity through the eyes of our children.

Yum! Let’s Eat!

Yum! Let's Eat - multicultural books for preschool

This book by Thando Maclaren takes us around the world, to learn about different foods and traditions. Read about exotic dishes like fajitas, sushi, dhal, roti and more! Explore the diversity in children’s lives and develop a worldwide perspective with this book, which is part of the “Our Lives, Our World” series. Other titles in the series include Brrmm! Let’s Go! and Goal! Let’s Play!

The Wibbly Wobbly Tooth

Wibbly Wobbly Tooth - multicultural picture books

Little Li woke up on a Monday morning, only to discover that his tooth is wibbly wobbly! His tooth went wibble wobble all day, until PLOP! it fell right out. Now what will Li do with the tooth?

This humorous story by David Mills, author of Lima’s Red Hot Chilli and Mei Ling’s Hiccups, explores different cultural traditions associated with losing a tooth. It’s a great story to start a class discussion about customs and shared experiences.

Multicultural Stories Giveaway

Language Lizard is co-sponsoring a Multicultural Stories Class Library Giveaway… Enter below by April 1, 2017 for a chance to win!

Giveaway Multicultural Class Library

 

“Woman in Library” by David Niblack via imagebase.net is licensed under CC0 http://imagebase.net/photo/696/Woman-in-Library.html

How to Create a Classroom Listening Center

Headphones and bookIf your classroom or library makes use of learning centers, you may be thinking about setting one up as a listening center. Students of all ages and levels, especially English language learners, benefit from this type of interactive, multi-sensory learning. Below, we offer some tips to help get your listening center up and running.

Make a Listening Center Plan

What type of Listening Center best suits your classroom? Would you like your students to focus on literacy gains and improve comprehension and vocabulary? Or do you want to focus on increasing their motivation to read, and improving their self-esteem and interpersonal skills? What are their reading levels? Do you want to rotate themes throughout the year to supplement your lesson plans?

What kind of seating will you have? A large rug, bean bags and chairs are good options. How much space do you have available, and how many students will fit? Having a separate set of learning materials for each student is ideal; but if they must share, you generally want to limit groups to no more than 3.

What listening technology will you use? You can opt for books on CD, MP3 players, ipods, or an interactive audio learning set.

Interactive Audio Learning Set

How will you keep items organized? It’s best to clearly label books, buttons and learning materials. An interactive learning product like the PENpal Audio Recorder Pen allows teachers and students to record messages onto stickers with recordable labels, so your listening center can be fully customized.

Gather Your Listening Center Supplies

Now that you have a materials list for your center, it’s time to gather the supplies! Let parents know about your plan, and ask them to donate cash or supplies. Families may have unused MP3 players or ipods at home, as well as rugs, bean bag chairs and storage bins. You may want to implement a BYOHP (Bring Your Own Head Phones) policy for your students.

Check if any materials can be borrowed from your school and local libraries, or create a classroom project donation request on donorschoose.org and ask parents to promote it on social media.

It may be a good idea to team up with other teachers of the same grade level, to create a shared listening center. While this cooperative method comes with additional scheduling and maintenance concerns, it eases the initial burden of fundraising for any one classroom. And remember, it’s ok to start your Listening Center small, and build over time!

Do you have an outstanding Listening Center at your school? Comment below and share what makes it so great!

“Audio Book” by Jeff Golden via Flickr is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 https://flic.kr/p/88og6h

Language Lizard is co-sponsoring a Listening Center giveaway… Enter below by January 14, 2017 for a chance to win!

Celebrate Diversity! #CelebrateDiversity

holding handsAfter this divisive and polarizing election season, one thing is clear: Now more than ever, we need to celebrate the diversity in our nation and our communities.

“I can imagine nothing more terrifying than an Eternity filled with men who were all the same. The only thing which has made life bearable…has been the diversity of creatures on the surface of the globe.”  – T.H. White

It is clear that some of the rhetoric during this campaign encouraged an ignorance about various ethnic groups and religions.  It also empowered white-supremacists and gave a voice to those who exploit minorities, as is evidenced by the increase in hate crimes and racist incidents since the election. This must be rejected and battled at every turn.

Nelson Mandela said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.”  We need to use our knowledge to educate people about different cultures and beliefs. We need to show them the beauty of a diverse society; the strength we derive when we all work together to solve problems. We need to support those who are struggling and fearful, and show them that they are valued, appreciated and heard.

Join us as we launch our non-partisan campaign to Celebrate Diversity!

What can you do?

  • Share your thoughts and ideas on our blog, or via Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #CelebrateDiversity.
  • Post your beautiful images of diversity on Instagram. Share your videos about diversity on YouTube.
  • When you need encouragement, look at the images and ideas that others have shared.

Celebrate Diversity – Resources

For ideas on celebrating diversity, and teaching children about other ethnicities, religions and cultures, take a look at some of our ideas on the subject, and share your own with us!

How are you educating others about diverse religions and cultures? How are you supporting children (and adults) who are anxious and fearful about their future?

“#68 A Pair of Hands – Holding Hands” by RichardBH via Flickr is licensed under CC BY 2.0 https://flic.kr/p/fAn6w8

Branching Out: Idioms & Language Learners

idioms in many languagesLearning a new language is hard work – definitely no walk in the park! As a teacher, parent or student, you may find yourself so busy with the basics of vocabulary, pronunciation and grammar that you’re hesitant to add any more work. But idioms – sayings with a shared meaning in a community, which aren’t decipherable from their words alone – are an important part of language learning, too. Read on for some helpful tips to “pave the way” to learning idioms in a new language.

Why are Idioms Important to Language Learners?

The English language has thousands (maybe even tens of thousands) of idioms, so there’s a significant amount of day-to-day communication that can be conducted through idioms. Without lessons in local idioms, communicating effectively can be that much more difficult for a language learner.

For older students, especially, learning idioms can be one of the most fun parts of learning a new language. It also helps them get a better sense of the spirit of the community, and understand what that culture values most.

Tips to Teach Idioms

You’ll want to start by choosing a handful of idioms to explore with your language learners. Make your choices based on the most likely social scenarios they will find themselves in, according to their age and development level.

Make lessons fun by using idioms in sample sentences, and asking students to guess their meanings from their context. You may want to include pictures that illustrate when and how the idioms would be used.

Remember to have students practice how to use each idiom properly, since this type of communication can very nuanced. It’s best to teach idioms verbally, and have students practice by role playing.

What are you favorite idioms, in English or another language? Comment and share below!