All posts by languagelizard

Benefits of Home Language Maintenance, From Parents’ Perspectives

Nearly one in three U.S. children live in a household where a language other than English is spoken, but are the same number of children fluent in their home language? Actually, many parents struggle to maintain the home language for a variety of reasons: when spoken to in the home language, children respond in English; some teachers encourage English only at home (the perception that another language confuses children is false); parents, their children and many societal groups view home languages as inferior to English. These examples of parent struggles with home language maintenance resonate with immigrant families across the U.S.

Subtractive & Additive Bilingualism

Despite the fact that many first generation immigrant parents in the U.S. speak their native languages at home, they are noticing that their children are losing fluency and interest in their home language. The 2002 National Survey of Latinos, in which 3,000 Latino adults living in the United States participated, found the following: Almost three fourths (72%) of first generation Latinos speak Spanish as their primary language, but only one in four (24%) are bilingual, and 4% speak primarily English. “In contrast, second generation Latinos are mostly divided between those who are English dominant (46%) and those who are bilingual (47%). Third generation or higher Hispanics are largely English dominant (78%)” (p. 16). In Latino families, second and third generation children are statistically more likely to become English dominant by adulthood, rather than bilingual dual language learners.

After years of teaching young children in the San Francisco Bay Area, several of whom were living in households where Spanish was spoken, I started to notice the broad range of Spanish speaking skills among them. Having researched the problem of subtractive bilingualism in graduate school, I was less surprised to see the erosion of Spanish than I was to see the maintenance of Spanish in some households. Specifically, I wondered how or why parents perceived home language maintenance as advantageous. From a Latino parent’s perspective, what were the perceived benefits of maintaining the home language?

I set out to explore this question in my doctoral dissertation during the 2011-2012 school year.  There are many proven benefits – cognitive, socio-emotional, developmental, cultural, and professional – of raising dual language learners. I, however, was particularly curious about Latino parent perceptions of home language maintenance and its benefits. Most importantly, language maintenance is more likely in an additive bilingual environment where the home language is celebrated and honored. While the following advantages are perhaps somewhat predictable and unsurprising, these tend to be the driving forces for home language maintenance amongst parents.

Speaking from the Heart

Adults and children alike express themselves much more naturally and organically in their native languages. In our study, parents spoke critically to their children about the benefits of building stronger relationships with family members vis a vis communicating in Spanish. It’s never too early to start having these conversations with preschoolers and early elementary aged children, explaining how meanings can get lost in translation when a feeling or sentiment is expressed in a second language. Children are very capable of code switching and understanding context!

A Better Future

Bilingual parents want the same advantages they’ve experienced (or strive to experience) in the workplace for their children. Being valued for their ability to communicate with more people, both locally and internationally, is important to bilingual parents who utilize their language skills in their careers and often in their local communities. Parents can have regular conversations about the value of bilingualism with their children, especially in an increasingly global workplace. Children are always motivated by real world connections!

Bridge Between Culture and Language

When parents express pride in their native languages, children often come to see their bilingualism as not only an asset, but a privilege. Their home language is not always appreciated or even acknowledged in other settings, such as school or extra-curricular activities. Children can become more authentically connected to their family and native cultures and traditions when speaking to and engaging with monolingual relatives who have less exposure to English and/or U.S. culture. Visits to the home country are much more meaningful for children who speak the language, and the native culture is more easily accessible. Language maintenance takes time, effort, and resolve, but the rewards can be life changing.

Emily Enstice is a former teacher at Willow Creek Academy, a K-8 charter school in Sausalito, California. She received her doctorate in International and Multicultural Education from the University of San Francisco.

 

“together” by Spirit-Fire via Flickr is licensed under CC BY 2.0 https://flic.kr/p/8dLJyi

25 Favorite Children’s Books About Diversity

Best 25 Children’s Books About DiversitySearching around for a really special gift for multicultural families and teachers working in diverse communities? Check out our new, exclusive collection of 25 of the best multicultural books for grades 1-3 that celebrate diversity and teach children about different cultures. (Note: Additional sets targeted to Pre-K through K, and to grades 3-5, are also available on the Language Lizard site.)

New Set of Multicultural Books Makes a Memorable Gift for Teachers & Families

The books portray children from various backgrounds, including Hispanic, Asian, African American, Middle-Eastern, and Native American. The stories help children embrace their unique heritage, better understand the immigrant experience, and enjoy entertaining folktales from around the world.

With this collection, children in diverse communities will appreciate those around them and build selfesteem as they read books in which their cultures and ethnicities are represented.

All books in this set are in English. If you are looking for bilingual multicultural books, click here or visit our language-specific pages.

Multicultural Stories Include:

  • An inspiring book about an immigrant girl from Korea looking to fit into her new life in America. A “Best Children’s Book of the Year” by Publishers Weekly and School Library Journal, this story is very relatable to children of all backgrounds moving to the United States, trying to create a new home.
  • A story about a young girl during the holy month of Ramadan who must choose between covering for her brother and doing the right thing.
  • A child is reminded to be proud of her unique and special hair and, more importantly, proud of who she is. Many children and adults alike will relate to this story of self-acceptance and self-love.
  • A folktale from Thailand that teaches a valuable lesson about being thankful for what you have, and the risks of having much more than you need.
  • A girl who has lost her vision is able to overcome adversity to run in her school’s Field Day race. With the help of her friends, teachers and family, she proves that she is able to do all the same things that somebody with sight can do.
  • A heartwarming story showing the hardships an elderly person faces when adjusting to life in a new country, and how a grandmother and grandchild are able to help their family by sharing parts of their culture.
  • The story of two girls, one Jewish and one Muslim, and their beautiful friendship. Both go to great lengths to care for the other’s well-being, providing valuable lessons to all children who read this book.
  • A story about the discrimination African Americans faced in the workplace teaches children about the simple things that were denied to them, and how many people bravely fought to end these unfair practices.
  • A Penn Belpre Honor Book Award winner, this story about relating to your grandparents, who do not share the same customs or language as you, pertains to many second or third generation children in America.
  • A simple chapter book about a young Latino reporter who will do anything to find out how a worm got into her friend Javier’s burger. She hopes this story will be her big break to becoming a distinguished reporter!
  • The struggles of an immigrant Chinese family to settle into their new life in America are relieved when a stranger helps them connect to their past home in a way they did not know was possible.
  • Winner of a Benjamin Franklin Award, Moonbeam Children’s Book Award and the Children’s Choice Award, this Native American folktale shares the important lesson of believing in yourself and not listening to the negative words of others.
  • A Coretta Scott King Award winning story about the hardships of life as an African American girl in the early 1900’s who wants to attend school, her fight to get there, and the ambitious learner she becomes through hard work and dedication.
  • A story about the daughter of migrant workers who feels as if she cannot find her place anywhere since her family is constantly moving according to the harvest. Eventually, she succeeds in making her mark.
  • A young girl living in West Africa wants to be like the other women in her family and wear a malafa, but her family believes she is too young to wear it. She wants to show them that she is old enough to understand the significance of wearing it and respect the sacred act.
  • A Vietnamese folktale about brothers who lead very different lives, one rich and one poor, and how fate always has a way of making things even in the end.
  • An enlightening story about a young boy trying to escape the shadow of his father because they have the same name. He loves his father dearly, but wants to create his own name so he can have a different legacy.
  • A children’s book that teaches the importance of diversity and how it makes us unique. The children in the book learn that being nice to everyone regardless of what they look like is crucial, and that everyone deserves to be treated with the same respect and dignity.
  • A Caldecott Medal winner, this book shares the touching story of a young man who came to America in search of a new life and adventure, and his eventual return to his home country of Japan. The book then shares his daughter’s and his grandson’s story, coming full circle in the end.
  • A classic Chinese folktale about a duck that is taken by a Lord who wants to keep him as a prized possession.  A kind maid releases the bird and faces punishment, but will her deeds be rewarded?
  • A multicultural book that follows a boy going around the world to learn about different cultures and to meet diverse people. The details and friendly illustrations allow readers to travel around the world in a book.
  • A Cherokee legend about a husband and wife who quarrel, and then make up by a field of sweet strawberries, teaches important lessons about the act of forgiveness and gratitude.
  • Two Jim Crow era young African American girls fight discrimination by creating a shoe store of their own where African Americans can try on shoes in the store, which is something they cannot do in any store operated by a white person. This story teaches important historic lessons while also showing children who persevere in the face of adversity.
  • Ganesha, a young elephant child, loves anything sweet and sugary, but he takes his love too far. A humorous twist on a classic tale (with amazing, colorful illustrations) that introduces Indian culture and Hindu literature.
  • A Caldecott Honor Book that shows a community coming together to help a family in need, and celebrates the joy of working hard to save up for something special.

A few reviews of the books in this collection:

– “A sensitive and inspiring portrait of a family’s triumph in the face of adversity.” – Kirkus Reviews

– “Wonderful watercolor illustrations complete this sensitive, sweet story of learning to love yourself without compromise.” – Chicago Tribune

– “The immigrant experience has rarely been so poignantly evoked as it is in this direct, lyrical narrative that is able to stir emotions through the sheer simplicity of its telling… [The illustrations] seem to be moments taken from life, intensely personal and at the same time giving voice to and confirming an experience shared by countless others.” – Horn Book, starred review

“Yoon may be new to America, but her feelings as an outsider will be recognizable to all children.” – Publishers Weekly, starred review

– “This one stands tall not just for delving into a piece of labor history not previously covered, but for its ability to relate history with heart in resonance.” – Kirkus Reviews, starred review

– “..a picture book story influenced by Native American folklore. The stylized artwork and the educational addendum perfectly complement this enchanting fairy tale.” – Midwest Book Review

– “Celebrates the natural world simplified, softened, and sunlit. A delectable choice for reading aloud.” – Booklist

– “A tender knockout… it’s rare to find much vitality, spontaneity, and depth of feeling in such a simple, young book.” – Kirkus Reviews

– “… rich with magic, compassion and love. …elegant watercolor and pastel drawings… are exquisite.” – Publishers Weekly

– “When Shirin helps Ali, it changes their relationship and reveals the meaning of Ramadan.” – Booklist

– “A poignant yet realistic story… stunningly illustrated.” – Choices, Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Giving Thanks Around the World

Thanksgiving is here! Let’s take a look at the meaning behind this holiday in the US, and what its traditions have in common with celebrations in other parts of the world. And learn to say “thank you” in different languages!

Harvest Celebrations

basket with food itemsThe first Thanksgivings celebrated by the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag Indians were a celebration of a good harvest.

Harvest celebrations are held in every part of the world, throughout the year. For example, Vietnam celebrates the Mid-Autumn Festival, and Israel celebrates the festival of Sukkot. (Check out our post for fun and easy kids crafts that celebrate these harvest celebrations and more.)

Giving Thanks

hands holding "give thanks"Thanksgiving is an opportunity to pause our hectic schedules, and appreciate all that we have to be grateful for.

In the US, we generally express our gratitude with the words “thank you,” with meaningful gifts, and with gestures like hugs and handshakes.

Every language has its own way of saying the words “thank you,” as shown in this colorful thank you poster with 40 different languages (e.g., Gracias, Danke, Salamat, Obrigado, Hvala, Paldies, Diolch, Tack, Gijtto, Falemindert, Asante, Merci).  Each culture has its own unique set of norms for showing gratitude, as well. In India, for example, people only actually say “thank you” to strangers, not loved ones.  And, in the Philippines, the act of giving is given more importance than the actual item being given.

Sharing a Meal with Loved Ones

people sharing a holiday mealThanksgiving’s “main event” is the meal. While the stuffed turkey is the star of the show, just as important are the sides of cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, pumpkin pie and countless others.

The first Thanksgiving menu in 1621 likely included seafood, like mussels and lobster, and a dish cooked inside a hollowed-out pumpkin.

There are a variety of traditional dishes enjoyed at gatherings in the winter months. In Mexico, tamales are a popular dish. In Japan, people dine on hot Udon soup. Speckknödel (dumplings) is traditional in Germany. See our post for more winter holiday dishes, with links to recipes.

What’s your favorite part of the Thanksgiving holiday? Comment below and share your unique traditions!

“Happy Thanksgiving” by Faith Goble via Flickr is licensed under CC BY 2.0 https://flic.kr/p/8UykdQ

“A holiday feast with my dearest friends, Masako and Satch Takayasu” by Ron Frazier via Flickr is licensed under CC BY 2.0 https://flic.kr/p/pEzNEZ

Top African Folktales For Kids Available in Spanish, Arabic and more!

MAMY WATA AND THE MONSTER (BILINGUAL)

Language Lizard is excited to announce that one of our favorite world folktales – Mamy Wata and the Monster – is now available in English with Arabic, French, Hungarian, Lithuanian, Polish and Spanish. An English only version is also available.

This beautifully illustrated book is on the list of the 100 Best African Books of the Century.  It is also part of Language Lizard’s collection of Folktales from Around the World.

It tells the story of a man who was cursed into a life as a monster because he refused to marry the daughter of a witch. Mamy Wata, the queen of the water, is the only one willing to open her heart and see the true feelings of this beast.

Like all the best fables, this story imparts invaluable lessons for children, showing that not everyone is as they seem on the outside.  Mamy Wata also emphasizes the importance of forgiveness and love when she accepts the man for who he is.

Discount on Mamy Wata through November 30, 2017

For a limited time, Language Lizard is offering a 10% discount on this African Folktale. Simply enter code MAMY17 when placing your order online through November 30, 2017 to receive this discount.

Visit our YouTube channel to see a video and hear the story in English.

25 Must-Read Multicultural Books for Preschoolers and Kindergartners

Set of 25 multicultural children's booksLanguage Lizard is thrilled to offer a new, exclusive collection of must-read multicultural books for preschool and kindergarten children! This set of books gives you an instant, award-winning library of diverse books for your classroom or home. No need to search around! We’ve selected 25 of our favorite multicultural stories that expose children to cultural and ethnic diversity and celebrate differences.

The books portray children from various backgrounds, including African American, Hispanic, Middle-Eastern, Asian and Native American. The set includes stories related to the immigrant experience, books that help children embrace their unique heritage, and folktales from around the world. 

The entertaining and well-reviewed stories help students appreciate diversity and build community with those around them. Children in diverse classrooms will build self esteem as they read/hear books in which their culture or ethnicity is represented. (Note: All books in this set are in English. Educators looking for bilingual multicultural booksclick here or visit Language Lizard’s language-specific pages.

Stories Included in the Collection

  • An Ezra Jack Keats Book Award winner that explores the similarities of two children who live in very different communities across the world.
  • A child revels in who she is despite her differences. An ode to self-esteem, with fun and silly illustrations.
  • An Asian folktale in which a young child is rewarded for his honesty and loyalty. An IRA-CBC Children’s Choice and An American Bookseller “Pick of the Lists.”
  • A sweet story in which a girl helps her Tia (aunt) earn money for a new car (since much of their savings goes to relatives who live far away). Winner of an Ezra Jack Keats New Writer Award, an Amelia Bloomer List Selection and an American Library Association Notable Children’s Book.
  • An introduction to Ramadan in which a young boy shares his experiences of this special time and wants to try to fast like the grown-ups do.
  • A book that looks at children all over the world and illustrates our common humanity.
  • A child is teased for looking different and learns how to celebrate his differences.
  • A book celebrating non-violent social change and winner of the Coretta Scott King Award, illustrated by a three-time Caldecott Honor Recipient.
  • A Latino boy “conquers the world” (except his sisters!) while teaching kids about a theatrical, action-packed sport that is popular in many Spanish-speaking countries. A Pura Belpre Illustrator Award winner, a Bank Street Best Children’s Book of the Year and an ALSC Notable Children’s Book.
  • Observing the features that make us unique, a story that celebrates what makes each child special.
  • A Chinese girl learns to appreciate what her culture has to offer during an “American” holiday. An IRA Notable Book for a Global Society.
  • A simple introduction to racial and ethnic diversity that teaches children that you can’t tell what someone is like from the color of their skin. An ALA Notable Book.
  • A book with diverse characters that inspires and guides young children to recognize their self-worth and develop confidence in themselves. Includes a section of discussion questions, activities, games and tips.
  • A trickster gets into trouble when he tries to do what goes against his nature. Winner of an ALA Notable Children’s Book, an ABA Pick of the Lists, and a National Parenting Publications Gold Award.
  • A story that uses colors as the backdrop for sharing Muslim culture, with artwork that brings classical elements of Islamic art into a modern setting.
  • A classic Chinese legend in which a poor boy helps thwart a greedy emperor’s plan.
  • With bright, bold illustrations, an artistic child notices and appreciates the colors of her friends.
  • A young girl delights in her favorite Korean dish… with details about how readers can prepare it themselves!
  • A reassuring book that encourages kids to embrace their individuality and celebrate multiculturalism.
  • A lovely Native American folktale that cautions children against bragging and teasing. An NCSS-CBC Notable Children’s Trade Book in the Field of Social Studies and a Parenting Magazine Reading-Magic Award Winner.
  • A look at different families around the world, what they do and how they help each other.
  • A Caldecott Medal winner, magical woodcuts are used in an Indian fable that explores big versus little, and the nature of pride.
  • A book celebrating different cultures illustrates that the things that make us different also make us special.
  • A simple story about friendship with culturally diverse characters and suggested after-reading activities.
  • A lovely book about the children of the world and their inherent similarities. Supports The Global Orphan Project.

Just a Few Reviews of the Books in this Collection

  • “Bold illustrations celebrate diversity with a child’s open-hearted sensibility and a mother’s love.” – Kirkus Reviews
  • “With its universal themes of wanting to fit in, self-acceptance, and self-esteem, this read-aloud is sure to strike a chord with many young readers/listeners, and on a variety of subjects, not just race.” – School Library Journal
  • “Explores the child’s experience of straddling two cultures – and serves up an ending as satisfying as sweet-and-sour pork and crusty dessert.” -The Washington Post
  • “A beautifully crafted book that will be enjoyed as much for the richness of its illustrations as the simplicity of its story.” – School Library Journal
  • “Children will appreciate the warm, personal narrative, as well as the connections with Muslims all over the world.” – Booklist
  • “Beautiful full-color illustrations portray this ancient Chinese folktale…” – Notable Children’s Trade Books in the Field of Social Studies
  • “A splendid tale, perfectly paced for an amusing read-aloud” – Publisher’s Weekly (starred review)
  • “… strong, dramatic woodcuts perfectly interpret the old fable.” – School Library Journal
  • “[An easy read] with child-friendly illustrations and easy-to-understand examples of real-life situations.” – Skipping Stones: A Multicultural Children’s Magazine.
  • “Expressive, child’s-eye watercolors get in on all the activity… in this celebration of a well-loved cultural dish” – Horn Book
  • “… [focuses] on positive thinking and assertive, kind behavior that can bolster children’s mental health, their relationships, and their performance in school.” – Sean Covey, best-selling author of The 7 Habits of Happy Kids
  • “Beautiful…. This will enrich and spark discussions of diversity.” – Booklist
  • “The Strength of family and the importance of pursuing one’s dreams are the bedrock of [this…] picture book.” – Publishers Weekly
  • “An essential book that acknowledges in the simplest of terms our common humanity.” – Kirkus Reviews

Unique Children’s Books About Diversity

 Children's Books About Diversity: English-only Multicultural Book Sets

Language Lizard is excited to offer new sets of Multicultural Books in English. They are a great way to introduce kids to new cultures and traditions, and to celebrate diversity in the classroom and at home.

New Multicultural Book Sets

CULTURAL HOLIDAYS: DIWALI, EID & CHINESE NEW YEAR (3 BOOK SET)Our Cultural Holidays set helps children learn about 3 important holidays around the world: Diwali, Chinese New Year and Eid. Each of the books in this set is used in our multicultural lesson plans about these important holidays. Readers can download the multicultural lesson plans for free.

CHILDREN'S BOOKS ABOUT DIVERSITY: FOOD, GAMES, TRANSPORTATION (3 BOOK SET)Our set of Children’s Books About Diversity: Food, Games, Transportation takes kids on a trip around the world, exploring the rich diversity of children’s lives. Kids will learn about exotic dishes, different games children play and the ways people get around in different countries.

Bilingual Multicultural Books

Please note that in addition to these English sets, we continue to offer bilingual multicultural books in 50+ languages! Readers can easily search by language on our site to find the right books in their languages of interest.

Huge Bilingual Books Giveaway for Celebrating the Bilingual Child Month

Language Lizard will give away a free “surprise set” of bilingual books to at least one lucky winner every month for a year… so you have more chances to win! We are launching our most exciting BILINGUAL BOOK GIVEAWAY on October 1st, 2017, the start of Celebrating the Bilingual Child Month.

Celebrating the Bilingual Child Month

October is an exciting month for language learners because it’s also Celebrating the Bilingual Child Month! Let’s take this opportunity to recognize the many children who speak two or more languages and understand multiple cultures. We can encourage literacy and parental involvement, and celebrate the children who work so hard to learn a new language.

Enter the Language Lizard Bilingual Book Giveaway

We will give away a free “surprise set” of bilingual books to at least one lucky winner every month for a year, so you have many chances to win. Over $1,000 of language materials will be given away! The multicultural children’s books offered in this giveaway will engage and inspire teachers and students in their continued language learning.

How do I enter for a chance to win?

It’s easy! Just fill out the form on our Giveaway Page AND sign up for Language Lizard’s Culture Connection newsletter.*

The sooner you sign up, the more chances you have to win – enter today! For more information and details on the giveaway, visit our Giveaway Page.

What languages will I receive?

Winners will receive bilingual books in one or more of the languages listed on their entry form.

Language Lizard bilingual books are available in English with Albanian, Arabic, Bengali, Bulgarian, Burmese, Chinese Simplified, Chinese Traditional, Croatian, Czech, Dari, Dutch, Farsi, French, German, Greek, Gujarati, Haitian Creole, Hebrew, Hindi, Hmong, Hungarian, Irish, Italian, Japanese, Karen (Sgaw), Korean, Kurdish, Latvian, Lithuanian, Malay, Malayalam, Nepali, Norwegian, Panjabi (Punjabi), Pashto/Pashtu, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Scottish-Gaelic, Shona, Slovakian, Somali, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Tagalog, Tamil, Thai, Tigrinya, Turkish, Twi, Urdu, Vietnamese, Welsh, Yiddish and Yoruba.

*Note: Existing newsletter subscribers do not need to resubscribe. Books will be sent to US or Canada addresses only.

Comment below and tell us how you celebrate the outstanding bilingual children in your life!

 

Text and fade added to “2010 10 31 Autumn leaves leave 4” by Mark Strobl via Flickr is licensed under CC BY 2.0 https://flic.kr/p/8PPonW

 

 

World Teacher’s Day Giveaway

World Teachers Day is coming up on October 5. Don’t forget to tell the wonderful teachers in your life how much their hard work is appreciated!

Brief History of World Teachers Day

World Teachers Day was first founded in 1994 by the United Nations to commemorate various intergovernmental recommendations regarding the rights and responsibilities of teachers around the world. These recommendations are guidelines that elevate the status of teaching and promote high quality education.

Enter Our World Teachers Day Giveaway

We’ve teamed up for a K-2 Teacher Giveaway in honor of World Teachers Day. Enter now through October 7, 2017, for a chance to win!

Enter for a chance to win a $100 Visa Gift Card
1. Like this post
2. Comment with your grade level
3. Enter our short Rafflecopter

4. Help us spread the word

How will you celebrate World Teachers Day? Comment below and share!

“Madagascar Teaching” by Frontierofficial is licensed under CC BY 2.0 https://flic.kr/p/dgmzdB

Being Bilingual in America: Statistics & Benefits of Bilingualism

What kind of people are most likely to be bilingual? What motivates them, and what benefits of bilingualism do they enjoy? Whether you’re bilingual, in the process of learning, or just curious about learning a new language, you’ll want to check out these interesting stats regarding bilingualism in the US.

Mugs that Celebrate Diversity & Languages – Back-to-School Gifts for Teachers and Students!

Mugs bilingual and multicultural gifts

It’s that time of year again – summer is winding down, and school is back in session! Language Lizard is offering a new set of colorful mugs that celebrate cultural diversity and the love of languages – perfect for educators, students and parents alike!

“Welcome” in Different Languages

"Welcome" in many languages multicultural mug

This unique mug says “Welcome” in many languages, and is a great gift for teachers who work in multicultural classrooms. Languages include Arabic, Burmese, Chinese, Czech, Dutch, Farsi (Persian), French, German, Greek, Gujarati, Haitian-Creole, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Lithuanian, Nepali, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Somali, Spanish, Swedish, Tagalog, Turkish, Ukrainian, Vietnamese and Yoruba.

Bilingual Superpower

Bilingual Superpower mug

Learning a new language takes dedication and a lot of hard work! Let the world know about your bilingual superpower! A great gift for students and teachers that encourages and promotes language learning. English-only edition of this mug is also available.

“We All Smile in the Same Language”

"We all smile in the same language" bilingual mug

Our “We all smile in the same language” bilingual mug has English on one side and Spanish on the other (English-only mug also available). A fun way to celebrate diversity and inclusion while enjoying your favorite beverage.

All mugs are 11oz  and microwave safe. Happy sipping!